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Author Topic: Islamophobia or Islamomania?


Alcuin
Moderator
Posts: 1007
Islamophobia or Islamomania?
on: August 8, 2018, 13:37

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-45083275
He said he was against bans on face-covering veils in public places, in his Telegraph column, but that it was "ridiculous" people chose to wear them.

The Muslim Council of Britain accused him of "pandering to the far right".

Labour MP Jess Phillips said she would report Mr Johnson to the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

The Muslim Council of Britain said the comments were "particularly regrettable in this current climate, where Islamophobia and anti-Muslim hatred is becoming worryingly pervasive"....

The chairman of the Conservative Muslim Forum, Mohammed Amin, said the article was "anti-Muslim" and would "whip up hatred of women who wear the niqab and burqa".

"Boris Johnson is a master of the English language - he must understand exactly what effect his language will have. I find it deplorable he chose to write such an article," he said.

The imam of Finsbury Park mosque, Mohammed Mahmoud, has, meanwhile, accused the government of failing to show "meaningful engagement" with the Muslim community....

Unquote.

"He must understand exactly what effect his language will have".
So must Imam Mahmoud understand exactly the effect of his language.

Muslims always respond to criticism by taking offence. They should spend as much time worrying about genuine prejudice, extremism and the persecution of non-believers and those of "wrong" faiths by their co-religionists in other countries.

Mr Johnson's choice of words may not be politic from their point of view, but it is hardly less offensive to over-react. To those who call "Islamophobia" I would say stop the "Islamomania". You have the same rights as me or anyone else - no more and no less. There's nothing special about any religion. Non of them are more useful than an outfit that looks like a bad habit.



Godless
Calcium
Posts: 20
Re: Islamophobia or Islamomania?
on: August 11, 2018, 14:50

Excellent post Alcuin.

I was talking to a friend the other day and we were trying to imagine what the country would look like if everyone covered there faces? What kind of sinister, isolated world would that be? A reasonable question to ask would also be “why don’t Muslim men have to cover up?”
For me an extremely sad and depressing recent phenomena is that fact when young women call face covering ‘empowering.’ I’m sure that a mugger also feels empowered by the fact that his wearing of a mask helps him avoid ccrv identification. The reality is more likely that these young girls, pressured by their families (male of course), don’t want to become outcast. With no way of safely rejecting face-covering they choose to save face (apologies) and decide to make it appear that they embrace it. That they prefer it. Who could prefer wearing a mask?

Full face covering in public should be illegal. It’s not even a requirement of Islam. It’s a requirement of a culture that treats women as the property of men. A culture that teaches that women are such harlots that their uncovered faces will tempt men into all manner of depravity. Well I’m afraid that it’s only true of men that have such a low opinion of women in the first place.

There has to be no more giving in. No face covering under any circumstance.



Alcuin
Moderator
Posts: 1007
Re: Islamophobia or Islamomania?
on: August 11, 2018, 17:23

"Full face covering in public should be illegal. It’s not even a requirement of Islam."

Certainly in places like schools, law courts and at security checks face-coverings should be banned. The objection has nothing to do with 'Muslim' or 'Islam', nor a culture we find alien or unpleasant. The aims are tolerance and freedom of speech and expression.

"A culture that teaches that women are such harlots that their uncovered faces will tempt men into all manner of depravity."

Resolving a question or a problem is only possible if it is correctly understood. The motivations you suggest (that women are forced or brainwashed) are only two motives. I suggest a more common motive is to attract attention. If they don't get it, they may act out in some other way. Many of the burk-uped may be British born and bred. Like wearing a ring through the nose or dying the hair purple, it is conformity they (ironically) rebel against and the attraction of a counter-culture which is the motivation.

From:
https://www.unilad.co.uk/featured/we-asked-muslim-women-what-they-really-think-about-wearing-the-burqa/
Recent YouGov statistics suggest that the majority of the British public would be quite happy to trail behind Bulgaria’s decision, with just 25 per cent opposing a UK burqa-ban and 57 per cent in favour – although this number has decreased gradually each year since 2011, when 66 percent wanted to ban the garment.
Unquote.
And
"Zeena is 17. She lives in a bustling Islamic community on the outskirts of Leeds. She is ambitious, driven and adamant that within ten years, she’ll be a surgeon for the NHS.
She is also the first woman in her family to wear the niqab. “Yes, it represents something I believe in – but it isn’t the only thing I believe in,” she told me.
Zeena adds that she chose to wear the niqab aged 15, after a growing number of girls began to wear the traditional Islamic dress.
Unquote.
The last sentence suggests peer pressure is the motivation.

"There has to be no more giving in".

It isn't a question of giving in so much as of understanding. I think Zeena (quoted above) is ignorant. Why covering the face is unacceptable needs to be explained, religion or none.

The aim isn't to suppress Islam but to persuade people why such superstitions and sectarian allegiances are bad for our common community.

"..we were trying to imagine what the country would look like if everyone covered their faces? What kind of sinister, isolated world would that be?"

Exactly, very true, but an extension taken too far? The problem is with a few burka or niqab wearers, not with everyone.

Religion shouldn't be suppressed. People must be persuaded to see it for what it is - superstition, divisive and faith-based. They need to face the problems it entails.

I find people who wear balaclavas during demonstrations or because they are in a gang on a street far more objectionable. Burka-wearers aren't criminals and are free citizens like the rest of us. The trick is to get them to see that and not hide their faces thinking they make a point.



Alcuin
Moderator
Posts: 1007
Re: Islamophobia or Islamomania?
on: August 12, 2018, 14:35

I don't think wearing the veil disturbed this driver...
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/aug/10/bristol-bus-driver-muslim-woman-remove-face-veil
It was what he perceived it to represent: a hostile, intolerant, superstitious, harmful, sectarian sub-culture. The right way to stop Islamophobia is to end Islamomania like madrassas, child genital mutilation, fancy dress, religious rules that treat women differently from men, praying five times a day, fasting, fatwas that attack aspects of our society and even individuals (e.g. Salman Rushdie), and all the other ridiculous palaver.

From:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jabron_Hashmi
However, some Muslims called him a traitor and an apostate to Islam. Mahmud Abdul Baari, a follower of the exiled preacher Omar Bakri Mohammed, called Hashmi a terrorist, adding: "Although born Muslim [he] grew up to become an apostate traitor to Islam and professional terrorist who unlike members of al-Qa'eda took a salary"

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